TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL

 “TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL’
The word ‘lupus’ originated from the Latin word ‘wolf’. It’s attributed to a 19th century physician who used it to describe rashes or scarred irritations on the skin of his patients that looked like the bite of a wolf.

The wolf is considered as a ferocious animal which ravages just like lupus does. 

Lupus is life – threatening, unpredictable and can damage organs in the body.

Living with lupus is like living with a wolf in the inside. Do we allow the wolf (lupus) to ravage our bodies or find ways of taming it?

Taming the wolf involves taking measures to ensure we keep lupus under control.

Together we can make a difference by joining forces to educate lupus warriors and the public about Lupus.

Molly’s Fund Lupus Hair Loss and Alopecia Explained – Molly’s Fund

Getting diagnosed with lupus is scary and upsetting enough without the added stress of potential hair loss. The physical ramifications of what systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can do to the body internally are indeed very scary. But the emotional toll of looking in the mirror and seeing a dramatic change in our external appearance is just one more thing that can make living with lupus more difficult. So, can lupus cause hair loss? The simple answer is, unfortunately, yes. Because lupus causes widespread inflammation throughout the body, many times it can also involve your skin-which is the largest organ of the body. Inflammation of the skin can result in rashes or even hair loss occurring most often on the face and scalp. The medical term for hair loss is alopecia. It is usually described as hair noticeably thinning orHair loss problem with hairbrush falling out in clumps or in patches. Although a few people with lupus will lose clumps of hair, the disease can also cause gradual thinning of the hair on your scalp. It is also possible to notice loss of hair of the eyelashes, eyebrows, beard or body. There are two main types of alopecia: scarring and non-scarring. Scarring means that the hair follicles have been destroyed by inflammation (and thus there is no chance of hair re-growth). Discoid lupus is one major cause of scarring alopecia. However, if caught early enough (before scarring takes place), it is possible to see hair regrowth. Non-scarring means that the hair follicles are still present and hair regrowth is possible. Hair loss can be one of the first signs or symptoms of lupus. Approximately half of lupus patients will experience at least some form of lupus hair loss and alopecia. This often occurs at the beginning of the disease but can also appear along with certain medications and treatments that may be prescribed to manage more serious lupus symptoms. Back to top  

To read more please go to Lupus Hair Loss and Alopecia Explained

How Lupus Affects the Body

  In people with lupus, the immune system begins to recognize and attack the body’s own tissues. This phenomenon is similar to “friendly fire” and causes inflammation in various parts of the body. It is important to realize, however, that lupus can affect different people in different ways and that signs and symptoms can come and go, producing periods of flares and remission. The following articles provide an introduction to how lupus may affect different parts of the body.

  * Antiphospholipid Antibodies Antiphospholipis antibodies are antibodies directed against phosphorus-fat components of your cell membranes called phospholipids, certain blood proteins that bind with phospholipids, and the complexes formed when proteins and phospholipids bind. Approximately 50% of people with lupus possesses these antibodies, and over a twenty-year period of time, one half of lupus patients with one of these antibodies—the lupus anticoagulant—will experience a blood clot.
* Arthritis “Arthritis” is a broad term used to describe inflammation of the joints. There are many subsets of arthritis, but the arthritis seen in lupus closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis   
 * Cardiovascular System Lupus can affect the cardiovascular system, which includes your heart and blood vessels. In fact, cardiovascular disease, not lupus itself, is the number one cause of death in people with SLE. Therefore, it is very important that you take steps to maintain optimal cardiovascular health.* Immune System in lupus and other autoimmune diseases, the immune system begins to recognize and attack “self.” In other words, the cells of the immune system begin to injure the body’s own tissues. This phenomenon is similar to “friendly fire” and can cause permanent scarring that ultimately jeopardizes the function of certain organs and systems in the body. Certain cells and processes of the immune system have been identified as playing a role in lupus.   

 * Kidneys About one half of people with lupus experience kidney involvement, and the kidney has become the most extensively studied organ affected by lupus.* Lungs About 50% of people with SLE will experience lung involvement during the course of their disease. Five main lung problems occur in lupus: pleuritis, acute lupus pneumonitis, chronic (fibrotic) lupus pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, and “shrinking lung” syndrome.  

 

* Nervous System Lupus can affect both the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system. Lupus may attack the nervous system via antibodies that bind to nerve cells or the blood vessels that feed them, or by interrupting the blood flow to nerves. Conditions associated with or sometimes seen in lupus include cognitive dysfunction, fibromyalgia, headaches, organic brain syndrome, and CNS vasculitis.  

 

* Skin Most people with lupus experience some sort of skin involvement during the course of their disease. In fact, skin conditions comprise 4 of the 11 criteria used by the American College of Rheumatology for classifying lupus. There are three major types of skin disease specific to lupus and various other non-specific skin manifestautions associated with the disease.

AUTO IMMUNE DISEASE, DIET, GLUTEN FREE, HEALTH, LUPUS, VEGETARIAN Pineapple and Butternut Squash Curry Posted by LIFEAFTERBREADBLOG on JANUARY 8, 2017

In my quest for interesting and exciting vegetarian dishes, I recently purchased the ‘Fast Vegetarian’ cookbook by Jane Baxter and Henry Dimbleby of ‘Leon‘ fame. I’d visited a couple of branches while living in London and was always impressed with the food. It is all clearly labelled wheat free, dairy free, vegetarian etc which is […]

via Pineapple and Butternut Squash Curry — A Life After Bread