Learn About Christina Harvey she is a Lupus Earrior

Please give this a watch. As most of you know I was diagnosed with Lupus in Jan 2017 after almost losing a few of my toes. I had absolutely no idea what Lupus was. These people inspire me and give me hope. I can relate to just about everything they are saying. I teared up watching just knowing Im not alone. I hate disappointing people and lately I have had to cancel many event due to the pain, lack of energy or drs appointments. Its hard making people understand a disease you dont even understand yourself. I am really thinking about organizing a walk and/or some fundraisers for Lupus awareness and research. Would any of my family and friends be interested??? Tommy Wright Stephanie Wright Jennifer Wright Jessica Wright Frankie David Harvey Alexandra Wright-Phipps Maxine Poteet Joseph Hunt Nikki Wilkins Angela Brown Sarah Stine Mickie Knuckles Selena Johnson Larry Ferguson

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With Lupus, Here Are 5 Ways to Stay Warm in Cool Weather


You read this BY MARISA ZEPPIERI

Feeling Like Fall: 5 Ways to Stay Warm with Lupus in Cool Weather

1. Never go to bed col

  Nothing worse  l than getting into a freezing cold bed at night .  You should consider looking into a heated mattress pad that has multiple heat settings.

2. Purchase clothing that can be layered

When building your outfit, consider sweat-wicking, stretchy, and comfortable fabrics

3. Warm up through liquids

When the temperatures drop, drinking warm liquids throughout the day and staying hydrated is one of the quickest ways for me to warm up.

4. Invest in some heat packs

If you need another way to stay warm over the next few months, I highly recommended adding heat packs to your list. A variety of brands and sizes can be found on Amazon

5. Protect yourself from germ

This isn’t necessarily a “warming” tip, but it is something I do consistently when the weather gets cooler to help protect myself from nasty germs. I make a shot-like drink that contains fresh crushed garlic, lemon juice, aloe vera juice, grated ginger, and honey. I have found that drinking this on a regular basis has really helped my already battered immune system stay in check. Sometimes I even add a dash of cayenne pepper for a little extra kick!

Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders


There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders
Vitamin D has a well-established role in calcium metabolism and bone health, but recently there has been a great deal of research looking at the effect of vitamin D on other body tissues, especially immune cells. It is now known that there are vitamin D receptors (VDRs) located in the nuclei of all immune cells, including antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells, and B and T lymphocytes. There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

To read more please go to

http://doctormurray.com/vitamin-d3-is-important-in-autoimmune-disorders/

TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL

 “TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL’
The word ‘lupus’ originated from the Latin word ‘wolf’. It’s attributed to a 19th century physician who used it to describe rashes or scarred irritations on the skin of his patients that looked like the bite of a wolf.

The wolf is considered as a ferocious animal which ravages just like lupus does. 

Lupus is life – threatening, unpredictable and can damage organs in the body.

Living with lupus is like living with a wolf in the inside. Do we allow the wolf (lupus) to ravage our bodies or find ways of taming it?

Taming the wolf involves taking measures to ensure we keep lupus under control.

Together we can make a difference by joining forces to educate lupus warriors and the public about Lupus.

You can also find us at Facebook at Lupus My Invisible Companion. And on Twitter at. LupusMICompanion @LupusCompanion

Molly’s Fund Lupus Hair Loss and Alopecia Explained – Molly’s Fund

Getting diagnosed with lupus is scary and upsetting enough without the added stress of potential hair loss. The physical ramifications of what systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can do to the body internally are indeed very scary. But the emotional toll of looking in the mirror and seeing a dramatic change in our external appearance is just one more thing that can make living with lupus more difficult. So, can lupus cause hair loss? The simple answer is, unfortunately, yes. Because lupus causes widespread inflammation throughout the body, many times it can also involve your skin-which is the largest organ of the body. Inflammation of the skin can result in rashes or even hair loss occurring most often on the face and scalp. The medical term for hair loss is alopecia. It is usually described as hair noticeably thinning orHair loss problem with hairbrush falling out in clumps or in patches. Although a few people with lupus will lose clumps of hair, the disease can also cause gradual thinning of the hair on your scalp. It is also possible to notice loss of hair of the eyelashes, eyebrows, beard or body. There are two main types of alopecia: scarring and non-scarring. Scarring means that the hair follicles have been destroyed by inflammation (and thus there is no chance of hair re-growth). Discoid lupus is one major cause of scarring alopecia. However, if caught early enough (before scarring takes place), it is possible to see hair regrowth. Non-scarring means that the hair follicles are still present and hair regrowth is possible. Hair loss can be one of the first signs or symptoms of lupus. Approximately half of lupus patients will experience at least some form of lupus hair loss and alopecia. This often occurs at the beginning of the disease but can also appear along with certain medications and treatments that may be prescribed to manage more serious lupus symptoms. Back to top  

To read more please go to Lupus Hair Loss and Alopecia Explained

How Lupus Affects the Body

  In people with lupus, the immune system begins to recognize and attack the body’s own tissues. This phenomenon is similar to “friendly fire” and causes inflammation in various parts of the body. It is important to realize, however, that lupus can affect different people in different ways and that signs and symptoms can come and go, producing periods of flares and remission. The following articles provide an introduction to how lupus may affect different parts of the body.

  * Antiphospholipid Antibodies Antiphospholipis antibodies are antibodies directed against phosphorus-fat components of your cell membranes called phospholipids, certain blood proteins that bind with phospholipids, and the complexes formed when proteins and phospholipids bind. Approximately 50% of people with lupus possesses these antibodies, and over a twenty-year period of time, one half of lupus patients with one of these antibodies—the lupus anticoagulant—will experience a blood clot.
* Arthritis “Arthritis” is a broad term used to describe inflammation of the joints. There are many subsets of arthritis, but the arthritis seen in lupus closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis   
 * Cardiovascular System Lupus can affect the cardiovascular system, which includes your heart and blood vessels. In fact, cardiovascular disease, not lupus itself, is the number one cause of death in people with SLE. Therefore, it is very important that you take steps to maintain optimal cardiovascular health.* Immune System in lupus and other autoimmune diseases, the immune system begins to recognize and attack “self.” In other words, the cells of the immune system begin to injure the body’s own tissues. This phenomenon is similar to “friendly fire” and can cause permanent scarring that ultimately jeopardizes the function of certain organs and systems in the body. Certain cells and processes of the immune system have been identified as playing a role in lupus.   

 * Kidneys About one half of people with lupus experience kidney involvement, and the kidney has become the most extensively studied organ affected by lupus.* Lungs About 50% of people with SLE will experience lung involvement during the course of their disease. Five main lung problems occur in lupus: pleuritis, acute lupus pneumonitis, chronic (fibrotic) lupus pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, and “shrinking lung” syndrome.  

 

* Nervous System Lupus can affect both the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system. Lupus may attack the nervous system via antibodies that bind to nerve cells or the blood vessels that feed them, or by interrupting the blood flow to nerves. Conditions associated with or sometimes seen in lupus include cognitive dysfunction, fibromyalgia, headaches, organic brain syndrome, and CNS vasculitis.  

 

* Skin Most people with lupus experience some sort of skin involvement during the course of their disease. In fact, skin conditions comprise 4 of the 11 criteria used by the American College of Rheumatology for classifying lupus. There are three major types of skin disease specific to lupus and various other non-specific skin manifestautions associated with the disease.