Molly’s Fund Lupus Flares- Mollys Fund

Lupus Flares: Recognizing one, triggers, and prevention

What is a lupus flare and how do I recognize one?

Unpredictable and debilitating bouts with symptoms of the disease are known as flares.

At times lupus patients may have periods with few to no symptoms, commonly called remissions. Some physicians are uncomfortable with the term “remission” as lupus symptoms rarely disappear completely. They may, instead, choose to use the term “quiescence” (pronounced: kwee-ess-ence.) At other times the patient may have high disease activity which include unpredictable and debilitating bouts with symptoms of the disease.

Flares can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. For example: A mild flare could perhaps be signaled by a lupus rash, moderate flares could include the rash, fatigue, and joint or muscle pain, and severe flares could potentially cause damage to the organs including fluid buildup around the heart or even kidney disease or failure (called lupus nephritis), which would require immediate medical attention. Back to top  

So how is a lupus flare recognized?

Most lupus patients will have symptoms of muscle and joint pain as well as fatigue regularly, so what makes a flare different? Here are some warning signs of a pending lupus flare:

It is important to report any of these with your medical caregiver as soon as possible so that they can quickly assess and treat any symptoms that could signal a flare. Keeping a daily symptom journal can be a helpful tool. Back to top  

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Lupus Diet: Foods To Eat & Avoid

Give these diet tips a try!

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body. It causes the immune system to attack the body’s own healthy organs and tissues. Researchers believe that lupus develops in response to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Lupus treatment focuses on lowering inflammation levels to reduce flare-up’s. (1) Following a lupus diet can help lupus sufferers manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Lupus Diet Foods to Eat

1. Organic, Unprocessed Foods

Consuming organic, unprocessed foods can help limit your exposure to synthetic ingredients, pesticides and other toxins. Packaged, processed foods often contain harsh ingredients that can weaken the immune system.

2. Raw and Cooked Vegetables

Raw vegetables help create an alkaline environment in the body to lower inflammation levels. They also contain antioxidants, prebiotics, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals that help strengthen the immune system. The best vegetables to eat raw or cooked include leafy greens, garlic, onions, asparagus, artichokes, bell peppers, beets, mushrooms and avocado. (2)

3. Fresh Fruit

Fresh fruit is high in vitamins and important nutrients that helps boost the immune system. To help lower inflammation levels, add berries, pomegranate and cherries to your diet.

4. Herbs, Spices and Teas

Certain herbs, spices and teas are beneficial for lupus and other autoimmune conditions thanks to their anti-inflammatory and natural healing properties. Try ginger, turmeric, basil, oregano, thyme and green tea. (3)

5. Probiotic Foods

  1. Probiotics helps fill the gut with beneficial bacteria to strengthen the immune system and reduce digestive problems. Add kefir, kommbucha, sauerkraut, kimchi and cultured vegetables to your diet.

To Seymour please clic hilo.

Learn About Christina Harvey she is a Lupus Earrior

Please give this a watch. As most of you know I was diagnosed with Lupus in Jan 2017 after almost losing a few of my toes. I had absolutely no idea what Lupus was. These people inspire me and give me hope. I can relate to just about everything they are saying. I teared up watching just knowing Im not alone. I hate disappointing people and lately I have had to cancel many event due to the pain, lack of energy or drs appointments. Its hard making people understand a disease you dont even understand yourself. I am really thinking about organizing a walk and/or some fundraisers for Lupus awareness and research. Would any of my family and friends be interested??? Tommy Wright Stephanie Wright Jennifer Wright Jessica Wright Frankie David Harvey Alexandra Wright-Phipps Maxine Poteet Joseph Hunt Nikki Wilkins Angela Brown Sarah Stine Mickie Knuckles Selena Johnson Larry Ferguson


With Lupus, Here Are 5 Ways to Stay Warm in Cool Weather


Feeling Like Fall: 5 Ways to Stay Warm with Lupus in Cool Weather

1. Never go to bed col

  Nothing worse  l than getting into a freezing cold bed at night .  You should consider looking into a heated mattress pad that has multiple heat settings.

2. Purchase clothing that can be layered

When building your outfit, consider sweat-wicking, stretchy, and comfortable fabrics

3. Warm up through liquids

When the temperatures drop, drinking warm liquids throughout the day and staying hydrated is one of the quickest ways for me to warm up.

4. Invest in some heat packs

If you need another way to stay warm over the next few months, I highly recommended adding heat packs to your list. A variety of brands and sizes can be found on Amazon

5. Protect yourself from germ

This isn’t necessarily a “warming” tip, but it is something I do consistently when the weather gets cooler to help protect myself from nasty germs. I make a shot-like drink that contains fresh crushed garlic, lemon juice, aloe vera juice, grated ginger, and honey. I have found that drinking this on a regular basis has really helped my already battered immune system stay in check. Sometimes I even add a dash of cayenne pepper for a little extra kick!


Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders

There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders
Vitamin D has a well-established role in calcium metabolism and bone health, but recently there has been a great deal of research looking at the effect of vitamin D on other body tissues, especially immune cells. It is now known that there are vitamin D receptors (VDRs) located in the nuclei of all immune cells, including antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells, and B and T lymphocytes. There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

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Turning my test into a testimony! Join me in saying kNOw to Lupus!

KNOW LUPUS Public Service Announcement – 60 Second Version


Lupus 101: What Causes Lupus? – YouTube

By LiveHopeLupus