About Lucas part two

Lupus can be difficult to diagnose because its signs and symptoms often mimic those of other ailments. The most distinctive sign of lupus — a facial rash that resembles the wings of a butterfly unfolding across both cheeks — occurs in many but not all cases of lupus.       

 

Some people are born with a tendency toward developing lupus, which may be triggered by infections, certain drugs or even sunlight. While there’s no cure for lupus, treatments can help control symptoms.

No two cases of lupus are exactly alike. Signs and symptoms may come on suddenly or develop slowly, may be mild or severe, and may be temporary or permanent. Most people with lupus have mild disease characterized by episodes — called flares — when signs and symptoms get worse for a while, then improve or even disappear completely for a time.

The signs and symptoms of lupus that you experience will depend on which body systems are affected by the disease. The most common signs and symptoms include:  Fatigue and fever. Joint pain, stiffness and swelling, Butterfly-shaped rash on the face that covers the cheeks and bridge of the nose. Skin lesions that appear or worsen with sun exposure (photosensitivity).

 

 Fingers and toes that turn white or blue when exposed to cold or during stressful periods (Raynaud’s phenomenon). Shortness of breath, Chest pain, Dry eyes, Headaches, confusion and  and memory loss,.

You should see your doctor if you develop an unexplained rash, ongoing fever, persistent aching or fatigue.

occurs when your immune system attacks healthy tissue in your body. It’s likely that lupus results from a combination of your genetics and your environment. It appears that people with an inherited predisposition for lupus may develop the disease when they come into contact with something in the environment that can trigger lupus. The cause for lupus in most cases, however, is unknown. Some potential triggers include:

Sunlight. Exposure to the sun may bring on lupus skin lesions or trigger an internal response in susceptible people.  

Infections. Having an infection can initiate lupus or cause a relapse in some people.

Medications. Lupus can be triggered by certain types of anti-seizure medications, blood pressure medications and antibiotics. People who have drug-induced lupus usually see their symptoms go away when they stop taking the medication.

Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many areas of your body, including your: Kidneys. Lupus can cause serious kidney damage, and kidney failure is one of the leading causes of death among people with lupus. Signs and symptoms of kidney problems may include generalized itching, chest pain, nausea, vomiting and leg swelling (edema).

Brain and central nervous system. If your brain is affected by lupus, you may experience headaches, dizziness, behavior changes, hallucinations, and even strokes or seizures. Many people with lupus experience memory problems and may have difficulty expressing their thoughts.

Blood and blood vessels. Lupus may lead to blood problems, including anemia and increased risk of bleeding or blood clotting. It can also cause inflammation of the blood vessels (vasculitis).

Lungs. Having lupus increases your chances of developing an inflammation of the chest cavity lining (pleurisy), which can make breathing painful. You may also be more susceptible to pneumonia.

Heart. Lupus can cause inflammation of your heart muscle, your arteries or heart membrane (pericarditis). The risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attacks increases greatly as well.

Other types of complications

Having lupus also increases your risk of:. Infection. People with lupus are more vulnerable to infection because both the disease and its treatments weaken the immune system. Infections that most commonly affect people with lupus include urinary tract infections, respiratory infections, yeast infections, salmonella, herpes and shingles.

Cancer. Having lupus appears to increase your risk of cancer.

Bone tissue death (avascular necrosis). This occurs when the blood supply to a bone diminishes, often leading to tiny breaks in the bone and eventually to the bone’s collapse. The hip joint is most commonly affected.

Pregnancy complications. Women with lupus have an increased risk of miscarriage. Lupus increases the risk of high blood pressure during pregnancy (preeclampsia) and preterm birth. To reduce the risk of these complications, doctors often recommend delaying pregnancy until your disease has been under control for at least six months.

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COCONUT OIL IS… — Plant Me Watch Me Grow

My moisturiser , anti wrinkle cream and my re hydration tool! Not only does this magic oil help with any tummy problems (can’t poop, as its a natural laxative) but its so amazing for the biggest organ in your body – your skin! From sunburn to shaving rash this never lets me down. I use […]

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It’s Okay, Just Say It! — Flying Above Lupus

“I am the Butterfly, and i will do everything in my power to keep the Wolf leashed…” Even if it means saying NO! Saying no is a personal dilemma for me. I just really have a hard time saying it. I have an issue with letting people down and feeling like I can’t do things, […]

via It’s Okay, Just Say It! — Flying Above Lupus

Living With Lupus: Part 1 — A Lively Gurl

Hello, its been a couple of days since I have posted. Not to make excuses or anything but I haven’t been feeling all that great. I have said before that I want this to be a real experience with you guys and that this is my life blog. With that being said, Tuesday I went […]

via Living With Lupus: Part 1 — A Lively Gurl

Preparing for your Appointment

You’re likely to start by seeing your family doctor or primary care provider, but he or she may refer you to a specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other inflammatory joint conditions (rheumatologist). Because the symptoms of lupus can mimic so many other health problems, you may need patience while waiting for a diagnosis. Your doctor must rule out a number of other illnesses before diagnosing lupus. You may need to see a doctor who specializes in immune system diseases and disorders (rheumatologist) to confirm a diagnosis or to continue treatment.

  

What you can do to better help your doctor treat you.
Before your appointment, you may want to write a list of answers to the following questions:

1,When did your symptoms begin? Do they come and go?

2.Does anything seem to trigger your symptoms?

3.Have your parents or siblings had lupus or other autoimmune disorders?

4.What medications and supplements do you take regularly?

You may also want to write down questions to ask your doctor, such as:

1.What are the possible causes of my symptoms or condition?

2.What tests do you recommend?

3.If these tests don’t pinpoint the cause of my symptoms, what additional tests might I need?

4.Are there any treatments or lifestyle changes that might help my symptoms now?

5.Do I need to follow any restrictions while we’re seeking a diagnosis?

6.Should I see a specialist?

In addition to the questions that you’ve prepared to ask your doctor, don’t hesitate to ask questions during your appointment at any time that you don’t understand something.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may leave time to go over any points you want to spend more time on. Your doctor may ask:

1.Does sun exposure cause you to develop skin rashes?

2.Do your fingers become pale, numb or uncomfortable in the cold?

3.Do your symptoms include any problems with memory or concentration?

4.How much do your symptoms limit your ability to function at school, at work or in personal relationships?

5.Have you been diagnosed with any other medical conditions?

6.Are you pregnant, or do you plan to become pregnant?

Tests and diagnosis

Diagnosing lupus is difficult because signs and symptoms vary considerably from person to person. Signs and symptoms of lupus may vary over time and overlap with those of many other disorders. No one test can diagnose lupus. The combination of blood and urine tests, signs and symptoms, and physical examination findings leads to  he diagnosis.

Laboratory tests

Blood and urine tests may include:

Complete blood count. This test measures the number of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets as well as the amount of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells. Results may indicate you have anemia, which commonly occurs in lupus. A low white blood cell or platelet count may occur in lupus as well.

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate. This blood test determines the rate at which red blood cells settle to the bottom of a tube in an hour. A faster than normal rate may indicate a systemic disease, such as lupus. The sedimentation rate isn’t specific for any one disease. It may be elevated if you have lupus, another inflammatory condition, cancer or an infection.

Kidney and liver assessment. Blood tests can assess how well your kidneys and liver are functioning. Lupus can affect these organs.

Urinalysis. An examination of a sample of your urine may show an increased protein level or red blood cells in the urine, which may occur if lupus has affected your kidneys.

Antinuclear antibody (ANA) test. A positive test for the presence of these antibodies — produced by your immune system — indicates a stimulated immune system. While most people with lupus have a positive ANA test, most people with a positive ANA do not have lupus. If you test positive for ANA, your doctor may advise more-specific antibody testing.

Imaging tests

If your doctor suspects that lupus is affecting your lungs or heart, he or she may suggest: 

Chest X-ray. An image of your chest may reveal abnormal shadows that suggest fluid or inflammation in your lungs.

Echocardiogram. This test uses sound waves to produce real-time images of your beating heart. It can check for problems with your valves and other portions of your heart.

Biopsy Lupus can harm your kidneys in many different ways, and treatments can vary, depending on the type of damage that occurs. In some cases, it’s necessary to test a small sample of kidney tissue to determine what the best treatment might be. The sample can be obtained with a needle or through a small incision.

Making Soup from Scratch is Easy

Health Idealist

We make soup stock all winter long by saving chicken bones and pieces of vegetables in a bag in the freezer. You know those ends of carrots, green peppers and other veggie bits you don’t eat? Well, don’t toss them. Save them up and then once you get enough, put them in a pan and cover with filtered water and simmer for a few hours on the stove or in a slow cooker. Then strain it and you’ve got the basics to make a great soup. Keep in mind, for best flavor you probably want to keep cruciferous vegetables to a minimum when making stock since they tend to give up off odors when boiled for a long time.

Soup stock made this way contains minerals like magnesium and potassium that are very easy for your body to absorb. Since many of us are deficient in magnesium this is a…

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Lupus Transformation

Lupus In Color

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This lupus transformation through cocoons of pain is hard. You can’t deny it and you can’t ignore it. You can only understand that this difficult but beautiful metamorphosis will create a strong butterfly of change, power, bravery and strength in you.

#LupusInColor

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