Turning my test into a testimony! Join me in saying kNOw to Lupus!

KNOW LUPUS Public Service Announcement – 60 Second Version

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About Lucas part two

Lupus can be difficult to diagnose because its signs and symptoms often mimic those of other ailments. The most distinctive sign of lupus — a facial rash that resembles the wings of a butterfly unfolding across both cheeks — occurs in many but not all cases of lupus.       

 

Some people are born with a tendency toward developing lupus, which may be triggered by infections, certain drugs or even sunlight. While there’s no cure for lupus, treatments can help control symptoms.

No two cases of lupus are exactly alike. Signs and symptoms may come on suddenly or develop slowly, may be mild or severe, and may be temporary or permanent. Most people with lupus have mild disease characterized by episodes — called flares — when signs and symptoms get worse for a while, then improve or even disappear completely for a time.

The signs and symptoms of lupus that you experience will depend on which body systems are affected by the disease. The most common signs and symptoms include:  Fatigue and fever. Joint pain, stiffness and swelling, Butterfly-shaped rash on the face that covers the cheeks and bridge of the nose. Skin lesions that appear or worsen with sun exposure (photosensitivity).

 

 Fingers and toes that turn white or blue when exposed to cold or during stressful periods (Raynaud’s phenomenon). Shortness of breath, Chest pain, Dry eyes, Headaches, confusion and  and memory loss,.

You should see your doctor if you develop an unexplained rash, ongoing fever, persistent aching or fatigue.

occurs when your immune system attacks healthy tissue in your body. It’s likely that lupus results from a combination of your genetics and your environment. It appears that people with an inherited predisposition for lupus may develop the disease when they come into contact with something in the environment that can trigger lupus. The cause for lupus in most cases, however, is unknown. Some potential triggers include:

Sunlight. Exposure to the sun may bring on lupus skin lesions or trigger an internal response in susceptible people.  

Infections. Having an infection can initiate lupus or cause a relapse in some people.

Medications. Lupus can be triggered by certain types of anti-seizure medications, blood pressure medications and antibiotics. People who have drug-induced lupus usually see their symptoms go away when they stop taking the medication.

Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many areas of your body, including your: Kidneys. Lupus can cause serious kidney damage, and kidney failure is one of the leading causes of death among people with lupus. Signs and symptoms of kidney problems may include generalized itching, chest pain, nausea, vomiting and leg swelling (edema).

Brain and central nervous system. If your brain is affected by lupus, you may experience headaches, dizziness, behavior changes, hallucinations, and even strokes or seizures. Many people with lupus experience memory problems and may have difficulty expressing their thoughts.

Blood and blood vessels. Lupus may lead to blood problems, including anemia and increased risk of bleeding or blood clotting. It can also cause inflammation of the blood vessels (vasculitis).

Lungs. Having lupus increases your chances of developing an inflammation of the chest cavity lining (pleurisy), which can make breathing painful. You may also be more susceptible to pneumonia.

Heart. Lupus can cause inflammation of your heart muscle, your arteries or heart membrane (pericarditis). The risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attacks increases greatly as well.

Other types of complications

Having lupus also increases your risk of:. Infection. People with lupus are more vulnerable to infection because both the disease and its treatments weaken the immune system. Infections that most commonly affect people with lupus include urinary tract infections, respiratory infections, yeast infections, salmonella, herpes and shingles.

Cancer. Having lupus appears to increase your risk of cancer.

Bone tissue death (avascular necrosis). This occurs when the blood supply to a bone diminishes, often leading to tiny breaks in the bone and eventually to the bone’s collapse. The hip joint is most commonly affected.

Pregnancy complications. Women with lupus have an increased risk of miscarriage. Lupus increases the risk of high blood pressure during pregnancy (preeclampsia) and preterm birth. To reduce the risk of these complications, doctors often recommend delaying pregnancy until your disease has been under control for at least six months.

Coping With Lupus and Memory Loss 

  
Are you feeling forgetful? Lupus and memory loss can occur together.

I decided I would share about lupus and memory loss for this post. 

Lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus) can cause brain fog and memory problems. Lupus is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by the body’s immune system attacking itself – also known as an autoimmune disease.

Unfortunately, lupus can affect joints, skin, the kidneys, blood cells, the heart, lungs and the brain. When lupus affects the brain is can lead to lupus fog.
Thinking, Memory and Behavior

In about half of people with lupus, the disease attacks the brain and spinal cord. Lupus can also affect the peripheral nervous system, which is made up of the nerve fibers that give skin and muscles the power for feeling and movement. These developments can be very frightening and frustrating. Thankfully, there are steps a person can take to make things easier. Doctors who specialize in these complications are called “neurologists.”
What is the most common kind of lupus brain involvement?

Many people with lupus—at least one in five—have trouble thinking clearly at some point and experiences memory problems, confusion, fatigue, or difficulty expressing thoughts. Called cognitive dysfunction, the condition likely occurs because blood stops flowing as smoothly to the brain as it should. This also can happen when lupus antibodies cross the “blood-brain barrier,” directly damaging brain cells in areas that store memories and other important information. Cognitive dysfunction may come and go, but often steadily worsens over time.

What is lupus fog?

Lupus fog is the forgetfulness or fuzzy-headed feeling that can come along with lupus. Lupus fog can consist of memory problems, but it can also include cognitive impairment as well. Concentration, thinking ability, self-expression and memory problems can all be tied to lupus fog.

Unlike other cognition and memory disorders, like dementia, lupus fog does not get worse over time but can be temporarily worse during a lupus flare-up.

It is not fully understood why lupus fog occurs, but it is theorized that factors such as fatigue, stress and depression can all play a role in lupus fog. Another theory is that lupus fog can be a side effect of medications.
Lupus fog symptoms

Symptoms of lupus fog include:

* Lack of concentration or ability to focus

* Impaired ability to recall or remember information

* Difficulty problem solving, organizing information and critical thinking

* Trouble quickly coordinating hand-eye movements
Living with lupus fog

Another helpful tip that can make living with lupus fog easier is being honest with yourself – don’t be hard on yourself when you can’t recall something. Although it can be frustrating, putting yourself down won’t make it any better. Reaching out to others is also important, so they can begin to understand your condition and be more attentive and supportive of your needs. Family and friends can also be of more assistance if they know what exactly is going on. Lastly, speak with your employer and make them aware, so they don’t just believe you’re not doing a good job.

The more open you are about your condition, the less stress and depression you will feel; two factors that can make lupus brain fog worse.

Living with lupus fog can be frustrating and can affect everything from memory to concentration to thinking ability. But with proper coping mechanisms, living with lupus fog is possible. 
What is “lupus fog?”

A part of cognitive dysfunction, some people with lupus get spells of “fogginess” when, for several seconds or minutes, they can not get to information that they know is in their heads. They may read the same sentence over and over again, for example. Or struggle with a normally easy task, like balancing a checkbook or dialing a familiar number.
Here are some tips in order to better live with lupus fog.

* Put information in writing in case you cannot recall it later.

* Stay organized.

* Prioritize your daily tasks.

* Say things out loud; it helps with memory recall.

* Time yourself and schedule tasks.

* Play mind games to stretch your memory, like crosswords and other puzzles.

* Maintain healthy habits, such as exercising, eating well and getting proper sleep.
To read more about Lupus Fog and Memory Problems go to 

http://www.webmd.com/lupus/features/lupus-fog-memory-problems#1
All so check out this link below for more info.

http://www.lupusny.org/about-lupus/fight-lupus-body-and-mind/thinking-memory-and-behavior

How Lupus Affects the Body

  In people with lupus, the immune system begins to recognize and attack the body’s own tissues. This phenomenon is similar to “friendly fire” and causes inflammation in various parts of the body. It is important to realize, however, that lupus can affect different people in different ways and that signs and symptoms can come and go, producing periods of flares and remission. The following articles provide an introduction to how lupus may affect different parts of the body.

  * Antiphospholipid Antibodies Antiphospholipis antibodies are antibodies directed against phosphorus-fat components of your cell membranes called phospholipids, certain blood proteins that bind with phospholipids, and the complexes formed when proteins and phospholipids bind. Approximately 50% of people with lupus possesses these antibodies, and over a twenty-year period of time, one half of lupus patients with one of these antibodies—the lupus anticoagulant—will experience a blood clot.
* Arthritis “Arthritis” is a broad term used to describe inflammation of the joints. There are many subsets of arthritis, but the arthritis seen in lupus closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis   
 * Cardiovascular System Lupus can affect the cardiovascular system, which includes your heart and blood vessels. In fact, cardiovascular disease, not lupus itself, is the number one cause of death in people with SLE. Therefore, it is very important that you take steps to maintain optimal cardiovascular health.* Immune System in lupus and other autoimmune diseases, the immune system begins to recognize and attack “self.” In other words, the cells of the immune system begin to injure the body’s own tissues. This phenomenon is similar to “friendly fire” and can cause permanent scarring that ultimately jeopardizes the function of certain organs and systems in the body. Certain cells and processes of the immune system have been identified as playing a role in lupus.   

 * Kidneys About one half of people with lupus experience kidney involvement, and the kidney has become the most extensively studied organ affected by lupus.* Lungs About 50% of people with SLE will experience lung involvement during the course of their disease. Five main lung problems occur in lupus: pleuritis, acute lupus pneumonitis, chronic (fibrotic) lupus pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, and “shrinking lung” syndrome.  

 

* Nervous System Lupus can affect both the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral nervous system. Lupus may attack the nervous system via antibodies that bind to nerve cells or the blood vessels that feed them, or by interrupting the blood flow to nerves. Conditions associated with or sometimes seen in lupus include cognitive dysfunction, fibromyalgia, headaches, organic brain syndrome, and CNS vasculitis.  

 

* Skin Most people with lupus experience some sort of skin involvement during the course of their disease. In fact, skin conditions comprise 4 of the 11 criteria used by the American College of Rheumatology for classifying lupus. There are three major types of skin disease specific to lupus and various other non-specific skin manifestautions associated with the disease.

AUTO IMMUNE DISEASE, DIET, GLUTEN FREE, HEALTH, LUPUS, VEGETARIAN Pineapple and Butternut Squash Curry Posted by LIFEAFTERBREADBLOG on JANUARY 8, 2017

In my quest for interesting and exciting vegetarian dishes, I recently purchased the ‘Fast Vegetarian’ cookbook by Jane Baxter and Henry Dimbleby of ‘Leon‘ fame. I’d visited a couple of branches while living in London and was always impressed with the food. It is all clearly labelled wheat free, dairy free, vegetarian etc which is […]

via Pineapple and Butternut Squash Curry — A Life After Bread