Why should people with lupus stay out of the sun?

Because most people with lupus are photosensitive and sunlight can trigger symptoms from skin rashes to internal organ damage, protecting yourself from sun exposure is a vital part of lupus management. It’s important to know how ultraviolet light from the sun and other sources may stimulate an autoimmune response.
Lupus and Sun Exposure

Protect yourself

If you have lupus, protecting yourself from sun exposure is an essential part of managing your condition. Many people with lupus experience photosensitivity or unusual sensitivity to sunlight. This can trigger symptoms such as skin rashes, itching, and burning. Excess sun exposure can also cause flares in systemic lupus, triggering symptoms such as joint pain, weakness, and fatigue. In some cases, it can even cause internal organ damage.

The risks of UV radiation

Ultraviolet (UV) light is a type of invisible radiation that’s present in sunlight. There are three types: UVA, UVB, and UVC. According to research published in Autoimmunity Reviews, UVB rays seem to cause the most problems in people with lupus. UVA radiation can also contribute to symptoms.

If you have lupus, exposure to sunlight may trigger symptoms such as: 

 • lupus rash or lesions

 • fatigue or weakness

 • joint pain

 • internal organ swelling

To learn more go to

https://www.healthline.com/health/lupus-sun-exposure

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Autoimmune disorder lupus may be triggered by body’s bacteria

Some of the bacteria that live in our bodies seem to kick-start the autoimmune disorder lupus. In the future, targeted antibiotics might help. Disturbances in the body’s microbiome have already been linked to plenty of disorders, including autoimmune diseases, which occur when a person’s immune system starts to attack their own body. In people with lupus, this kind of attack often causes skin rashes, but can also damage other organs,  to read more go to the link below.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2165088-autoimmune-disorder-lupus-may-be-triggered-by-bodys-bacteria/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_medium=SOC&utm_source=Facebook#link_time=1522336087

Molly’s Fund Lupus Flares- Mollys Fund


Lupus Flares: Recognizing one, triggers, and prevention


What is a lupus flare and how do I recognize one?

Unpredictable and debilitating bouts with symptoms of the disease are known as flares.

At times lupus patients may have periods with few to no symptoms, commonly called remissions. Some physicians are uncomfortable with the term “remission” as lupus symptoms rarely disappear completely. They may, instead, choose to use the term “quiescence” (pronounced: kwee-ess-ence.) At other times the patient may have high disease activity which include unpredictable and debilitating bouts with symptoms of the disease.

Flares can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. For example: A mild flare could perhaps be signaled by a lupus rash, moderate flares could include the rash, fatigue, and joint or muscle pain, and severe flares could potentially cause damage to the organs including fluid buildup around the heart or even kidney disease or failure (called lupus nephritis), which would require immediate medical attention. Back to top  

So how is a lupus flare recognized?

Most lupus patients will have symptoms of muscle and joint pain as well as fatigue regularly, so what makes a flare different? Here are some warning signs of a pending lupus flare:


It is important to report any of these with your medical caregiver as soon as possible so that they can quickly assess and treat any symptoms that could signal a flare. Keeping a daily symptom journal can be a helpful tool. Back to top  

To read more go to

http://www.mollysfund.org/lupus-flares-recognizing-one-triggers-and-prevention/

Lupus Diet: Foods To Eat & Avoid

Give these diet tips a try!


Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can damage any part of the body. It causes the immune system to attack the body’s own healthy organs and tissues. Researchers believe that lupus develops in response to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Lupus treatment focuses on lowering inflammation levels to reduce flare-up’s. (1) Following a lupus diet can help lupus sufferers manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

Lupus Diet Foods to Eat

1. Organic, Unprocessed Foods

Consuming organic, unprocessed foods can help limit your exposure to synthetic ingredients, pesticides and other toxins. Packaged, processed foods often contain harsh ingredients that can weaken the immune system.


2. Raw and Cooked Vegetables

Raw vegetables help create an alkaline environment in the body to lower inflammation levels. They also contain antioxidants, prebiotics, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals that help strengthen the immune system. The best vegetables to eat raw or cooked include leafy greens, garlic, onions, asparagus, artichokes, bell peppers, beets, mushrooms and avocado. (2)


3. Fresh Fruit

Fresh fruit is high in vitamins and important nutrients that helps boost the immune system. To help lower inflammation levels, add berries, pomegranate and cherries to your diet.


4. Herbs, Spices and Teas

Certain herbs, spices and teas are beneficial for lupus and other autoimmune conditions thanks to their anti-inflammatory and natural healing properties. Try ginger, turmeric, basil, oregano, thyme and green tea. (3)



5. Probiotic Foods

  1. Probiotics helps fill the gut with beneficial bacteria to strengthen the immune system and reduce digestive problems. Add kefir, kommbucha, sauerkraut, kimchi and cultured vegetables to your diet.


To Seymour please clic hilo. 

https://www.davidwolfe.com/lupus-diet/

Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders


There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders
Vitamin D has a well-established role in calcium metabolism and bone health, but recently there has been a great deal of research looking at the effect of vitamin D on other body tissues, especially immune cells. It is now known that there are vitamin D receptors (VDRs) located in the nuclei of all immune cells, including antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells, and B and T lymphocytes. There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

To read more please go to

http://doctormurray.com/vitamin-d3-is-important-in-autoimmune-disorders/