TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL

 “TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL’
The word ‘lupus’ originated from the Latin word ‘wolf’. It’s attributed to a 19th century physician who used it to describe rashes or scarred irritations on the skin of his patients that looked like the bite of a wolf.

The wolf is considered as a ferocious animal which ravages just like lupus does. 

Lupus is life – threatening, unpredictable and can damage organs in the body.

Living with lupus is like living with a wolf in the inside. Do we allow the wolf (lupus) to ravage our bodies or find ways of taming it?

Taming the wolf involves taking measures to ensure we keep lupus under control.

Together we can make a difference by joining forces to educate lupus warriors and the public about Lupus.

Molly’s Fund Lupus Hair Loss and Alopecia Explained – Molly’s Fund

Getting diagnosed with lupus is scary and upsetting enough without the added stress of potential hair loss. The physical ramifications of what systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can do to the body internally are indeed very scary. But the emotional toll of looking in the mirror and seeing a dramatic change in our external appearance is just one more thing that can make living with lupus more difficult. So, can lupus cause hair loss? The simple answer is, unfortunately, yes. Because lupus causes widespread inflammation throughout the body, many times it can also involve your skin-which is the largest organ of the body. Inflammation of the skin can result in rashes or even hair loss occurring most often on the face and scalp. The medical term for hair loss is alopecia. It is usually described as hair noticeably thinning orHair loss problem with hairbrush falling out in clumps or in patches. Although a few people with lupus will lose clumps of hair, the disease can also cause gradual thinning of the hair on your scalp. It is also possible to notice loss of hair of the eyelashes, eyebrows, beard or body. There are two main types of alopecia: scarring and non-scarring. Scarring means that the hair follicles have been destroyed by inflammation (and thus there is no chance of hair re-growth). Discoid lupus is one major cause of scarring alopecia. However, if caught early enough (before scarring takes place), it is possible to see hair regrowth. Non-scarring means that the hair follicles are still present and hair regrowth is possible. Hair loss can be one of the first signs or symptoms of lupus. Approximately half of lupus patients will experience at least some form of lupus hair loss and alopecia. This often occurs at the beginning of the disease but can also appear along with certain medications and treatments that may be prescribed to manage more serious lupus symptoms. Back to top  

To read more please go to Lupus Hair Loss and Alopecia Explained