Ever wonder how you can cover up a rash on your face?

Join the conversation and discover information on important matters that are a part of your life. The new lupus community forum is a place where you give and receive support, exchange ideas, provide perspective and talk about what really matters to YOU.  Visit the discussion thread on our community forum for suggestions from the lupus community! Join the conversation and add your own recommendations too. Get started at lupusresearch.org/community 


By Research Alliance 

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Green beans are a nutritious vegetable that are rich in vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients such as vitamins A & C,.

Green beans are a nutritious vegetable that are rich in vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients such as vitamins A & C, calcium, iron, manganese, beta-carotene, and protein. Green beans provide signifiant cardiovascular benefits due to their omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid) content. They also contain ant-inflammatory compounds which make them highly beneficial for individuals who suffer with auto-immune disorders such as fibromyalgia, arthritis, COPD, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowl syndrome, chronic sinusitis, bursitis, Raynaud’s syndrome and lupus. They are also known to help prevent type 2 diabetes. Green beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber and can aid the digestive tract by promoting regular peristaltic action and aid in the removal toxic, cancer-causing substances in the digestive tract. They contain a wide variety of carotenoids such as lutein and neoxanthin and flavonoids such asquercetin and procyanidins which make them excellent for eye health and for preventing disease. Green beans can be snacked on raw, added to salads or soups, or steamed. Consider trying fresh green beans drizzled with olive oil, seasoned with your favorite spices, and roasted in the oven for 30 minutes for a healthy alternative to french fries. This crispy, savory snack is a great way to get kids and adults to love their vegetables. Fresh green beans are readily available at your local supermarket in the produce section. Also, keep a lookout at your local farmer’s markets for heirloom varieties of green beans that contain the ultimate in nutritional and health benefits.

Molly’s Fund Lupus Flares- Mollys Fund


Lupus Flares: Recognizing one, triggers, and prevention


What is a lupus flare and how do I recognize one?

Unpredictable and debilitating bouts with symptoms of the disease are known as flares.

At times lupus patients may have periods with few to no symptoms, commonly called remissions. Some physicians are uncomfortable with the term “remission” as lupus symptoms rarely disappear completely. They may, instead, choose to use the term “quiescence” (pronounced: kwee-ess-ence.) At other times the patient may have high disease activity which include unpredictable and debilitating bouts with symptoms of the disease.

Flares can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. For example: A mild flare could perhaps be signaled by a lupus rash, moderate flares could include the rash, fatigue, and joint or muscle pain, and severe flares could potentially cause damage to the organs including fluid buildup around the heart or even kidney disease or failure (called lupus nephritis), which would require immediate medical attention. Back to top  

So how is a lupus flare recognized?

Most lupus patients will have symptoms of muscle and joint pain as well as fatigue regularly, so what makes a flare different? Here are some warning signs of a pending lupus flare:


It is important to report any of these with your medical caregiver as soon as possible so that they can quickly assess and treat any symptoms that could signal a flare. Keeping a daily symptom journal can be a helpful tool. Back to top  

To read more go to

http://www.mollysfund.org/lupus-flares-recognizing-one-triggers-and-prevention/

Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders


There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
Vitamin D3 is Important in Autoimmune Disorders
Vitamin D has a well-established role in calcium metabolism and bone health, but recently there has been a great deal of research looking at the effect of vitamin D on other body tissues, especially immune cells. It is now known that there are vitamin D receptors (VDRs) located in the nuclei of all immune cells, including antigen-presenting cells, natural killer cells, and B and T lymphocytes. There is also a considerable amount of research showing that vitamin D deficiency has been associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

To read more please go to

http://doctormurray.com/vitamin-d3-is-important-in-autoimmune-disorders/

TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL

 “TAME THE WOLF AND TAKE CONTROL’
The word ‘lupus’ originated from the Latin word ‘wolf’. It’s attributed to a 19th century physician who used it to describe rashes or scarred irritations on the skin of his patients that looked like the bite of a wolf.

The wolf is considered as a ferocious animal which ravages just like lupus does. 

Lupus is life – threatening, unpredictable and can damage organs in the body.

Living with lupus is like living with a wolf in the inside. Do we allow the wolf (lupus) to ravage our bodies or find ways of taming it?

Taming the wolf involves taking measures to ensure we keep lupus under control.

Together we can make a difference by joining forces to educate lupus warriors and the public about Lupus.

You can also find us at Facebook at Lupus My Invisible Companion. And on Twitter at. LupusMICompanion @LupusCompanion