Cucumber juice is a highly alkalinizing and hydrating drink 

Cucumber juice is a highly alkalinizing and hydrating drink that is rich in nutrients such as vitamins A, C, K, magnesium, silicon, and potassium. It has the ability to cleanse and detox the entire body as well as help to alleviate digestive problems such as gastritis, acidity, heartburn, indigestion, and ulcers. It is also an ideal way to properly hydrate the body since it is contains beneficial electrolytes that have the ability to bring nutrients and hydration deep into the cells and tissues making it far more effective than water alone.Cucumber juice is also one of the best natural diuretics around, aiding in the excretion of wastes through the kidneys and helping to dissolve uric acid accumulations such as kidney and bladder stones. It has the ability to help reduce edema, bloating and swelling in the body. It also has wonderful anti-inflammatory benefits which can significantly benefit autoimmune and neurological disorders such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Migraines, Anxiety, Depression, Shingles, Eczema, Psoriasis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, & Lupus. 

Cucumber juice is also an excellent remedy for bringing down a fever in children and the convalescent. 8-16oz of fresh cucumber juice is recommended daily to help hydrate and recover the body.

Cucumber Juice

Ingredients:

2-4 cucumbers, organic 

Preparation:

Wash the cucumbers and cut as needed. Run the cucumbers through your juicer and drink immediately for best results. If you do not have a juicer, then blend the cucumbers and strain liquid.

Drink and Enjoy!

Learn more about the hidden healing powers of fruits & vegetables in the #1 New York Times Bestselling book Life-Changing Foods http://amzn.to/1SINq5p or http://bit.ly/2aaclgt

http://www.medicalmedium.com/blog/cucumber-juice

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Sunday clears away the rust of the whole week.”

Sunday clears away the rust of the whole week.”

Do whatever you think replenish your soul from over working.

Give yourself a break on a Sunday – watch your favorite movie, cook your favorite dish, or read a good book that you have no time to read during the weekdays. Do whatever makes you happy and you’ll see the great impact it has in lessening the stress.

Hug Your favorite sweetie.

About Sage


Sage is a legendary herb well known for its phenomenal health promoting and disease preventing properties. It is one of the top antioxidants herbs and can provide powerful protection from degenerative diseases such as diabetes, arthritis, cancer, heart disease, macular degeneration, inflammatory bowel disease, osteoporosis, prostatitis, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. 
Sage contains rosmarinic acid which is a potent anti-inflammatory compound that can help reduce swelling and inflammation and considered highly beneficial for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, bursitis, asthma, and atherosclerosis. Sage has anti-microbial and anti-bacterial properties and is an excellent natural remedy for fungal, viral, and bacterial infections. 
It also has the ability to provide relief from acidity and aid in digestion of fatty and hard to digest foods. Sage is known as the “thinker’s herb” as has an outstanding ability to enhance attention span, support concentration, and improve the senses as well as provide support when dealing with grief and depression. 
It can also help regulate the menstrual cycle and help to prevent excessive sweating in woman after menopause. Sage has the ability to neutralize free radicals and offer significant anti-aging and longevity benefits. It also contains antiseptic properties and is widely found in natural creams, lotions, and salves to speed the healing of cuts and wounds and clear up most skin diseases and infections. 
On a spiritual level, sage has long been used to aid in cleansing one’s spirit and surroundings. Sage has a peppery flavor and can be added to soups, potatoes, squash, tomato sauce, salads, guacamole, and even works well with some fruits like strawberries and banana smoothies. It can also be taken as a tea, capsule, or tincture for additional benefits. Sage is a wise, healing, and powerful herb that is a true gift and should not be missed.
Learn more about how to restore your thyroid in my new book Thyroid Healing http://amzn.to/2mfPiJ0

About Cherries

Cherries are a medicinal powerhouse fruit that are packed with vitamins A, C, E, and minerals such as iron, copper, zinc, potassium, and manganese. The high levels of anthocyanins and antioxidants found in cherries make them an excellent food to help the body fight against neurological diseases, diabetes, and breast, lung, colon, and stomach cancers. 
Cherries also contain potent anti-inflammatory properties and are particularly beneficial for those suffering with chronic pain, fibromyalgia, lyme’s disease, frozen shoulder, arthritis, gout, chronic fatigue syndrome, lupus, and sports injuries. Cherries are a well known “brain food” and can help to strengthen cognitive function by helping to improve memory, focus, and concentration and help to reduce brain fog. 
They are also a fantastic food for cardiovascular health and can help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and heart attacks. Cherries are an excellent source of melatonin which is known to calm the nervous system, decrease irritability, relieve neurosis, ease headache conditions and promote a solid nights sleep with a balanced sleep-wake cycle. 
This soothing effect on the brain neurons makes it an essential food for those who suffer from insomnia or for those who have high anxiety and stress in their lives. Cherries are rich in fiber and are a great natural remedy for constipation. When in season fresh cherries are a quick sweet snack that can easily be eaten while on the go. 
Frozen cherries are also a great alternative that can be added to smoothies for a nutritional boost. Frozen bananas and frozen cherries can be blended together in a food processor for a delicious dairy-free & fat-free ice cream that kids and adults both love. Pure cherry juice is also another alternative when fresh is unavailable and can be found online or at your local heath food store.
Learn more about which foods can heal and restore your body in my new book, click here http://bit.ly/MM-book

About Apricots

Apricots are incredibly high in minerals and rich in beta carotene and are one of the most healing fruits you can eat. They are one of the best sources for organic iron, copper, and cobalt making them very beneficial for anemia, digestive disorders, and reproductive health. Apricots are highly beneficial for autoimmune disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, asthma, lupus, colitis, IBS, and PCOS. 
They are also wonderful for keeping the heart strong and healthy as well as being a powerful weight-loss agent. Apricot’s high concentration of beta carotene makes them an excellent food for disease prevention, especially lung, skin, and stomach illnesses. And they are very helpful in helping to regrow hair and improve the quality of your hair, skin, and nails. 
Fresh apricots are always best, but when they are not available, dried apricots are a great alternative. Look for wild and/or organic varieties that do not have any preservatives such as sulfur dioxide. A handful of dried organic apricots each day is a fantastic snack that can help keep you energized and focused throughout the day.
Learn more about which foods can heal and restore your body in my new book, click here http://bit.ly/LCFBook

Why should people with lupus stay out of the sun?

Because most people with lupus are photosensitive and sunlight can trigger symptoms from skin rashes to internal organ damage, protecting yourself from sun exposure is a vital part of lupus management. It’s important to know how ultraviolet light from the sun and other sources may stimulate an autoimmune response.
Lupus and Sun Exposure

Protect yourself

If you have lupus, protecting yourself from sun exposure is an essential part of managing your condition. Many people with lupus experience photosensitivity or unusual sensitivity to sunlight. This can trigger symptoms such as skin rashes, itching, and burning. Excess sun exposure can also cause flares in systemic lupus, triggering symptoms such as joint pain, weakness, and fatigue. In some cases, it can even cause internal organ damage.

The risks of UV radiation

Ultraviolet (UV) light is a type of invisible radiation that’s present in sunlight. There are three types: UVA, UVB, and UVC. According to research published in Autoimmunity Reviews, UVB rays seem to cause the most problems in people with lupus. UVA radiation can also contribute to symptoms.

If you have lupus, exposure to sunlight may trigger symptoms such as: 

 • lupus rash or lesions

 • fatigue or weakness

 • joint pain

 • internal organ swelling

To learn more go to

https://www.healthline.com/health/lupus-sun-exposure

LUPUS AND CANCER 

Systemic lupus erythematosus (“lupus” or “SLE”) and other autoimmune diseases are linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Specifically, lupus patients may experience an elevated risk of lymphoma and other cancers, such as cancer of the cervix. Researchers have elucidated certain connections between lupus and cancer. 
For example, it is widely accepted that immunosuppressive medications, such as azathioprine (Imuran) and mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) contribute to elevated cancer risk. However, one of the largest studies to investigate this connection suggests that the risk of cancer is actually greatest during the earlier stages of lupus, indicating that exposure to immunosuppressive therapy is not the only link between lupus and cancer. Physicians do not yet understand the precise relationship between lupus and cancer.

Lupus and lymphoma

Studies show an increased risk of both Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in lupus patients. It is believed that the elevated risk of lymphoma results from the disease process of lupus—specifically the overstimulation of B-cells coupled with defects in the immune system’s surveillance system—and not just from medications or other associated risk factors. Some suggest that immunosuppressive medications also increase the risk of lymphoma and other blood cancers, especially 5 or more years after taking the drug. In addition, people with Sjogren’s syndrome, which is relatively common in lupus, experience an even greater elevation of lymphoma risk, suggesting that lymphoma in lupus patients may also be linked to this condition.

Lupus and breast cancer

Some data indicate that women with lupus experience an increased risk of breast cancer. Increased estrogen levels might contribute to a higher risk of breast cancer in women with lupus.

Lupus and lung cancer

Lung cancer is about 1.4 times more common in people with lupus than in the general population. Interestingly, people with lupus and lung cancer are more likely to experience rare types of lung cancer. However, like the general population, many of the people with lupus who develop lung cancer are smokers. In fact, 85% of lung cancer is caused by tobacco. It is very important that people with lupus do not smoke. Smoking not only increases the chance of developing lung cancer, it also ups the risk for cardiovascular disease (which is also markedly increased in people with lupus), and prevents lupus drugs like Plaquenil from working properly. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor. S/he can help you find the most effective strategy to curb your smoking habit.

Lupus and cervical cancer

Certain studies have shown an elevated risk of cervical cancer and abnormal PAP tests in women with lupus. One study linked the increased incidence of abnormal PAP tests with histories of sexually transmitted disease, contraceptive use, and immunosuppressive medications. 

Some physicians suggest that either the use of immunosuppressives or flawed inherent immunity lead to a decrease in the ability of lupus patients to fight off human papilloma virus (HPV), a virus associated with cervical cancer. [Gardasil (the HPV vaccine) is recommended for young women with lupus to reduce the risk of later cervical cancer.] However, like much of our knowledge of cancer in lupus, these connections are not fully known or understood.

Lupus and endometrial cancer

New evidence suggests that lupus patients also experience an elevated incidence of endometrial cancer, although the cause for this risk is unknown.

NSAIDs and cancer

It has been found that people with Rheumatoid Arthritis, another autoimmune disease, experience a lower incidence of colorectal cancer than the general population. Although the precise cause of this phenomenon is unknown, it has been attributed to the long-term (10 years or more) use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and aspirin. Evidence has also been found that long-term aspirin and NSAID use may also reduce the risk of colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer in the general population. It is likely that this benefit also holds for people with lupus, but that does not mean that one should begin taking aspirin and NSAIDs for this reason. In fact, long term NSAID use can increase cardiovascular disease. Therefore, you should only take medications as directed by your physician.

The importance of regular cancer screenings

Despite the increased risk of cancer in people with lupus, studies show that lupus patients are actually equally or even less likely than the general population to undergo cancer screenings. Thus, it is very important that you speak with your doctor about lupus and cancer to ensure that you see the appropriate physicians for cancer screenings as often as recommended.

Healthy habits

Certain risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hormone replacement therapy, and exposure to immunosuppressive medications, increase the chance that an individual will develop cancer. Therefore, it is also important that you practice healthy lifestyle habits. Obesity also increases the risk of certain cancers, so try to eat foods that help you maintain a healthy weight.

Sunlight causes lupus flares and also increases the risk of skin cancer. People with lupus should avoid the sun whenever possible. If you need to be outdoors, wear sunscreen with an SPF of 85 or greater and be sure that your sunscreen contains Helioplex to protect you from both UV-A and UV-B rays.

Sources

Gayed M, Bernatsky S, Ramsey-Goldman R, Clarke A, Gordon C. Lupus and cancer. Lupus. 209; 18(6); 479-85.

Research Update: Cancer in Lupus. (Based on presentation by Dr. Sasha Bernatsky at BC Lupus Society Symposium.) 22 Oct. 2005. Available at <http://www.bclupus.org/resources.html>.

http://www.hopkinslupus.org/lupus-info/lifestyle-additional-information/lupus-cancer/