Why should people with lupus stay out of the sun?

Because most people with lupus are photosensitive and sunlight can trigger symptoms from skin rashes to internal organ damage, protecting yourself from sun exposure is a vital part of lupus management. It’s important to know how ultraviolet light from the sun and other sources may stimulate an autoimmune response.
Lupus and Sun Exposure

Protect yourself

If you have lupus, protecting yourself from sun exposure is an essential part of managing your condition. Many people with lupus experience photosensitivity or unusual sensitivity to sunlight. This can trigger symptoms such as skin rashes, itching, and burning. Excess sun exposure can also cause flares in systemic lupus, triggering symptoms such as joint pain, weakness, and fatigue. In some cases, it can even cause internal organ damage.

The risks of UV radiation

Ultraviolet (UV) light is a type of invisible radiation that’s present in sunlight. There are three types: UVA, UVB, and UVC. According to research published in Autoimmunity Reviews, UVB rays seem to cause the most problems in people with lupus. UVA radiation can also contribute to symptoms.

If you have lupus, exposure to sunlight may trigger symptoms such as: 

 • lupus rash or lesions

 • fatigue or weakness

 • joint pain

 • internal organ swelling

To learn more go to

https://www.healthline.com/health/lupus-sun-exposure

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LUPUS AND CANCER 

Systemic lupus erythematosus (“lupus” or “SLE”) and other autoimmune diseases are linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Specifically, lupus patients may experience an elevated risk of lymphoma and other cancers, such as cancer of the cervix. Researchers have elucidated certain connections between lupus and cancer. 
For example, it is widely accepted that immunosuppressive medications, such as azathioprine (Imuran) and mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) contribute to elevated cancer risk. However, one of the largest studies to investigate this connection suggests that the risk of cancer is actually greatest during the earlier stages of lupus, indicating that exposure to immunosuppressive therapy is not the only link between lupus and cancer. Physicians do not yet understand the precise relationship between lupus and cancer.

Lupus and lymphoma

Studies show an increased risk of both Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in lupus patients. It is believed that the elevated risk of lymphoma results from the disease process of lupus—specifically the overstimulation of B-cells coupled with defects in the immune system’s surveillance system—and not just from medications or other associated risk factors. Some suggest that immunosuppressive medications also increase the risk of lymphoma and other blood cancers, especially 5 or more years after taking the drug. In addition, people with Sjogren’s syndrome, which is relatively common in lupus, experience an even greater elevation of lymphoma risk, suggesting that lymphoma in lupus patients may also be linked to this condition.

Lupus and breast cancer

Some data indicate that women with lupus experience an increased risk of breast cancer. Increased estrogen levels might contribute to a higher risk of breast cancer in women with lupus.

Lupus and lung cancer

Lung cancer is about 1.4 times more common in people with lupus than in the general population. Interestingly, people with lupus and lung cancer are more likely to experience rare types of lung cancer. However, like the general population, many of the people with lupus who develop lung cancer are smokers. In fact, 85% of lung cancer is caused by tobacco. It is very important that people with lupus do not smoke. Smoking not only increases the chance of developing lung cancer, it also ups the risk for cardiovascular disease (which is also markedly increased in people with lupus), and prevents lupus drugs like Plaquenil from working properly. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor. S/he can help you find the most effective strategy to curb your smoking habit.

Lupus and cervical cancer

Certain studies have shown an elevated risk of cervical cancer and abnormal PAP tests in women with lupus. One study linked the increased incidence of abnormal PAP tests with histories of sexually transmitted disease, contraceptive use, and immunosuppressive medications. 

Some physicians suggest that either the use of immunosuppressives or flawed inherent immunity lead to a decrease in the ability of lupus patients to fight off human papilloma virus (HPV), a virus associated with cervical cancer. [Gardasil (the HPV vaccine) is recommended for young women with lupus to reduce the risk of later cervical cancer.] However, like much of our knowledge of cancer in lupus, these connections are not fully known or understood.

Lupus and endometrial cancer

New evidence suggests that lupus patients also experience an elevated incidence of endometrial cancer, although the cause for this risk is unknown.

NSAIDs and cancer

It has been found that people with Rheumatoid Arthritis, another autoimmune disease, experience a lower incidence of colorectal cancer than the general population. Although the precise cause of this phenomenon is unknown, it has been attributed to the long-term (10 years or more) use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and aspirin. Evidence has also been found that long-term aspirin and NSAID use may also reduce the risk of colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer in the general population. It is likely that this benefit also holds for people with lupus, but that does not mean that one should begin taking aspirin and NSAIDs for this reason. In fact, long term NSAID use can increase cardiovascular disease. Therefore, you should only take medications as directed by your physician.

The importance of regular cancer screenings

Despite the increased risk of cancer in people with lupus, studies show that lupus patients are actually equally or even less likely than the general population to undergo cancer screenings. Thus, it is very important that you speak with your doctor about lupus and cancer to ensure that you see the appropriate physicians for cancer screenings as often as recommended.

Healthy habits

Certain risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hormone replacement therapy, and exposure to immunosuppressive medications, increase the chance that an individual will develop cancer. Therefore, it is also important that you practice healthy lifestyle habits. Obesity also increases the risk of certain cancers, so try to eat foods that help you maintain a healthy weight.

Sunlight causes lupus flares and also increases the risk of skin cancer. People with lupus should avoid the sun whenever possible. If you need to be outdoors, wear sunscreen with an SPF of 85 or greater and be sure that your sunscreen contains Helioplex to protect you from both UV-A and UV-B rays.

Sources

Gayed M, Bernatsky S, Ramsey-Goldman R, Clarke A, Gordon C. Lupus and cancer. Lupus. 209; 18(6); 479-85.

Research Update: Cancer in Lupus. (Based on presentation by Dr. Sasha Bernatsky at BC Lupus Society Symposium.) 22 Oct. 2005. Available at <http://www.bclupus.org/resources.html>.

http://www.hopkinslupus.org/lupus-info/lifestyle-additional-information/lupus-cancer/

About Green beans

Green beans are a nutritious vegetable that are rich in vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients such as vitamins A & C, calcium, iron, manganese, beta-carotene, and protein. Green beans provide signifiant cardiovascular benefits due to their omega-3 (alpha-linolenic acid) content. They also contain ant-inflammatory compounds which make them highly beneficial for individuals who suffer with auto-immune disorders such as fibromyalgia, arthritis, COPD, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowl syndrome, chronic sinusitis, bursitis, Raynaud’s syndrome and lupus. They are also known to help prevent type 2 diabetes. Green beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber and can aid the digestive tract by promoting regular peristaltic action and aid in the removal toxic, cancer-causing substances in the digestive tract. They contain a wide variety of carotenoids such as lutein and neoxanthin and flavonoids such asquercetin and procyanidins which make them excellent for eye health and for preventing disease. Green beans can be snacked on raw, added to salads or soups, or steamed. Consider trying fresh green beans drizzled with olive oil, seasoned with your favorite spices, and roasted in the oven for 30 minutes for a healthy alternative to french fries. This crispy, savory snack is a great way to get kids and adults to love their vegetables. Fresh green beans are readily available at your local supermarket in the produce section. Also, keep a lookout at your local farmer’s markets for heirloom varieties of green beans that contain the ultimate in nutritional and health benefits.

Autoimmune disorder lupus may be triggered by body’s bacteria

Some of the bacteria that live in our bodies seem to kick-start the autoimmune disorder lupus. In the future, targeted antibiotics might help. Disturbances in the body’s microbiome have already been linked to plenty of disorders, including autoimmune diseases, which occur when a person’s immune system starts to attack their own body. In people with lupus, this kind of attack often causes skin rashes, but can also damage other organs,  to read more go to the link below.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2165088-autoimmune-disorder-lupus-may-be-triggered-by-bodys-bacteria/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_medium=SOC&utm_source=Facebook#link_time=1522336087

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Managing lupus

Treatment is available that often can manage lupus symptoms effectively, but it may not always be possible to prevent heart, kidney and other health problems associated with the disease. Learn more from Dr. Uma Thanarajasingam, rheumatologist.

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I was diagnosed with lupus six months ago. I am 23. Are there things I can do now to prevent heart or kidney problems down the road?

ANSWER: Lupus is a complex autoimmune disorder that can affect any organ system in the body. Although you can take steps that may lower your risk for developing complications, it may not always be possible to prevent heart, kidney and other health problems associated with lupus. But treatment is available that often can manage symptoms effectively. Working closely with your care team to get regular checkups and blood tests to monitor your condition can help control lupus.

Lupus develops when your body’s immune system attacks your own tissues and organs. Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many body systems — including your heart, kidneys, joints, skin, blood cells, brain and lungs. Lupus is a chronic disease that does not have a cure at this time.

To read more of this article go to

https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-q-and-a-managing-lupus/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=sm&utm_content=post&utm_campaign=mayoclinic&geo=national&placementsite=enterprise&mc_id=us&cauid=100502&linkId=48589631